5 Tips for HVAC Keyword Research – How to Find the Golden Keywords and Avoid Costly Errors

1. HVAC keyword phrases should be supported by useful and relevant content.

For example, an HVAC contractor found that many people came to their website in search of AC service offers. This was a popular keyword in search traffic, but they had no content specifically developed around it, and service offers were not properly displayed on the site.

For this contractor, considering the keyword’s relative popularity, it would have been foolish to not offer the proper and relevant content built around “AC service” related keyword searches.

2. HVAC keyword phrases should generate significant volume.

Researching keywords is a critical step in delivering visitors to your HVAC website. Take advantage of the Google Keyword Planner by entering a search term such as “ac repair” or “furnace replacement” and let the tool offer hundreds of relative alternatives.

3. HVAC keyword phrases can be “long tail.”

The average number of words that online searchers enter into the search interface constantly expands and evolves. Ten years ago, few would have put 8 words or more into a single search phrase.

But now these “long tail” keyword searches happen more and more frequently.

So think about what your customers are really searching for and expand the quality of their results from your website offers.

4. HVAC keyword phrases should be relevant to the needs of the HVAC consumer.

Pick your keywords carefully. Consumer needs are very specific and so should your offers be as well. If the consumer is searching “furnace repair” and you offer up an AdWords ad about system replacements, your efforts are wasted for both you and the consumer.

5. HVAC keywords are selected based on the content of your site.

Google judges the overall relation of the keywords you select and the ads you compose to the landing page the visitor will view when they click your ad.

Google has released the following as an indicator of what they look for when reviewing your site for a seamless transition from your paid search ads and the content of the site:

  • Would you trust the information presented in this article?
  • Is this site written by an expert, or is it shallow in nature?
  • Does the site have duplicate, overlapping or redundant content?
  • Does this site have spelling, stylistic or factual errors?
  • Are topics driven by the genuine interests of readers of the site?
  • Does the site provide original content or information?
  • Does the page provide value compared to other pages in search results?

Take a look at the pages on your website. Do they meet these criteria or are they lacking in some or all of the elements? If so, identify the keywords that are driving the most relevant traffic to your site and revamp your pages to meet Google’s high expectations.



Source by Michael L Haines

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